Tag Archive | travel blog

The Perks of Proximity

Being close is cool.  Suddenly I can chat in the evening when it’s also the evening for family and friends gathered together today to celebrate us all being in the U S of Blessed A.  Suddenly West Coast chums are watching the sun go down just as I am, even if it’s from California instead of Washington.

I’ve heard before that travel makes the world seem smaller.  Maybe it’s my years of travel that make me giddy to be so close with those I love who are still not actually here in my new state.

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He’s Out, Baby

Last week JD left Vietnam.  In many ways it feels like the final curtain call on our time in Da Nang.  When I left, it was a certain close of a chapter.  But, he carried on our connection to our fun, fancy-free and sometimes (fabulously?) dysfunctional life there.  When he left, we really, actually left.   And I really, actually moved here.

It’s a bit sad.  And a bit happy.

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He’s In, Baby!

Woohoo to you, America!  You let a good one in.  I’m grateful and giddy for your decision (really).  And you were so gracious and accommodating about the whole process (not).  Anyhoo, JD has his Green Card and that’s all that matters for the moment.

And so, what does this bright-eyed, bushy tailed new American resident have to look forward to here in the Pacific Northwest?  Let’s find out.

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Old and New Balance

All my energy is spent on New.  New students, new environment, new friends.  The New is intriguing and necessary. But at this particular moment of lull, it’s the old and taken-for-granted which grabs my interest.  In my current obsession with New I don’t want to leave out learning more about that which has become recently Old.

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Thank You, Vietnam

I found this old post I wrote when I thought we’d stick to the original plan and leave after two years in Vietnam.  We stayed five.  However today I really, actually move on.  In re-reading this, I realize how much Vietnam has grown on me in the past few years.  I like her even more now than I did when I wrote the “letter” below.  Vietnam, it’s been great!

Dear Vietnam,

When we met I was overwhelmed by your frenzy.  I slapped your mosquitoes, hated your heat and feared your scooters.  Time and time again you made me wonder why I’d come.  In our two years together I watched from the other side of the world as I lost two of the dearest people in my life in my first few months here and spent half my salary to fly away from you.  To put it lightly, we were unlikely friends.

And yet, I will miss you.  Our roller coaster ride included so, so many highs.  Never again will I see a beach so beautiful and deserted.  Never again will I be such an anomaly in my own neighborhood.  Never again will my awkwardness and lack of language be so quickly forgiven – and compensated for by those who should resent me.  I will never again meet such purely lovely children who want to learn and love school and work to ridiculous extents just to become smarter.

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I am a Bad Immigrant

I read somewhere that long-distance couples often fight just before one of them is about to leave.  Sort of a self-preservation thing or preference to feeling angry instead of sad.  Vietnam and I were doing that, I thought.  What with all the cockroaches, cheeky geckos, broken house appliances going on I was sure he was trying to pick a fight.  But seems he’s reconsidered his strategy.  Now that our departure date nears Vietnam is pulling out all the stops to make sure I miss him.

As if reminding me of his beauty while hosting guests and traveling around weren’t enough, he’s managed to make the weather cooler than normal.  I love him all the more.  And I’m all the more reminded of how bad I’ve been to him.  I moved here to be with him, but I have not done it gracefully.

I am a bad immigrant.

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Won’t You Be My Neighbo(u)r?

Won’t You Be My Neighbo(u)r?

Hello there, friendly future neighbor!  We’re the new immigrants in town.  One of us anyway, the other has just been away awhile.  We may dress funny.  We may talk wrong.  We may eat foods with chopsticks and even throw “u”s into your well-established alphabet.  But we are just people. We know we’re different.  We know we’re not from here.  We know we have an accent.  Pointing it out is as redundant as saying ATM Machine.  So please, help us help you.  Want to get to know us?  Great!  But please actually get to know us as friends, not as a sparkle at your next cocktail (or karaoke) party.

Here are the top 10 questions immigrants are asked (and may be sick of answering):

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Life as an Ex-Ex-Pat

The nomadic daughter is returning.  Sort of.  Though I’ll still be a four-hour flight away from my family, purple mountain majesty lies ahead.  This move has had more planning and paperwork than any of our others.  But after a year of hoop hopping and other cliché rigmarole, JD’s card is now almost Green and so’s his horn.  African in tow, I’m coming back, America.

We want this and have worked for it and paid a pretty US penny for it.  Even still, it’s bittersweet.  Not just leaving Vietnam and our friends, but also leaving a particularly ear-perking noun.  I will no longer be an ex-pat (big hat immigrant, if you will).  Soon I’m just a regular old pat.

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Doing Much for Little

After six months in Central America, three years in Africa and five years in Southeast Asia poverty seems normal.  Until recently when it didn’t.

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The Change Happening

Many Americans have a soundtrack for Vietnam in mind.  The songs popular with soldiers in the war – and popular in movies about soldiers in the war – talk about peace, frustration and, primarily, change.  Like a rolling stone, I moved here to watch every season turn, turn, turn and further wonder what war is good for.  And in my half decade in Vietnam, I’ve found a playlist about change to be perfectly fitting.

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